Dying is hard work

“—not the physical part, but that part which is the inside of me, the work about who I am, who I have been, and who I will be.”

– David Kuhl, What Dying People Want

 

Dear Hospice,

“Thank you and your team for all you did for Bob and me. It made it all so much easier. We grew to love the two volunteers you sent. Their approach to Bob was different and exactly right. They were so unstinting with their time. Two remarkable human beings! Thank you for staying in touch.”
~Laura

Caring for those who are suffering,

“whether or not they are dying, wakes us up. It opens up our hearts and our minds. It opens us up to the experience of wholeness.”

-Frank Ostaseski


Mission Statement

Providing practical, emotional and spiritual support to individuals and their loved ones through the stages of dying, death and bereavement.

Hospice palliative care aims to make the last months of life comfortable, peaceful and dignified for patients and their caregivers by providing care, support, respite and advocacy. Our trained Hospice volunteers work as part of a caregiving team that could include community home nursing, doctors, hospital and facility staff, social workers and spiritual leaders.

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Nelson

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East Shore

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Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyMonday, October 15th, 2018 at 12:22pm
We may be a bit behind the curve, but just discovered ZDoggMD and his amazing set of videos. Fun, informative, and very straightforward. You'll be seeing more of them on this page but in this one, he interviews a friend and co-worker about his experience of witnessing his father's death to prostate cancer and his grief. It's honest, insightful and a wonderful example of a man being wiling to express the full emotional range of his frustration, grief, AND the joy, humour and beauty that arises in the course of his father's dying process. So much wisdom here. You don't need to watch the whole thing, the important part is in the first 25 minutes.
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyThursday, October 11th, 2018 at 1:11pm
What we’ve always called “the rally” now has a new technical term and its being studied. Our brains/bodies/hearts/minds are so fascinating! One thing we are mindful of though ... the last days rally doesn’t always happen so remember to say what you need to say today ... don’t wait!
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyMonday, October 8th, 2018 at 12:08am
“As for grief, you’ll find it comes in waves. When the ship is first wrecked, you’re drowning, with wreckage all around you. Everything floating around you reminds you of the beauty and the magnificence of the ship that was, and is no more. And all you can do is float. You find some piece of the wreckage and you hang on for a while. Maybe it’s some physical thing. Maybe it’s a happy memory or a photograph. Maybe it’s a person who is also floating. For a while, all you can do is float. Stay alive.” This story is filled with wonderful metaphors for what happens when we grieve.

If you need support in your grief please join our Thursday night grief support group by calling 250-352-2337.
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyFriday, October 5th, 2018 at 4:18pm
I can’t put my finger on how this piece touched me ... but it did! And it highlights how our hospice volunteers create moments of understanding and intimacy with clients who need that.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/19/opinion/disability-multiple-sclerosis-losing-touch.html
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyTuesday, October 2nd, 2018 at 10:18am
Seems like it’s the right time for a Frank O. download .... here’s a sweet podcast showcasing his thoughts on working with the dying.
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyTuesday, September 18th, 2018 at 10:02am
The Jewish tradition has so much to teach us about grieving and dying and atonement. Yom Kippur, I’ve now learned, is about not looking away from one’s mortality but practicing for it.