Dying is hard work

“—not the physical part, but that part which is the inside of me, the work about who I am, who I have been, and who I will be.”

– David Kuhl, What Dying People Want

 

Dear Hospice,

“Thank you and your team for all you did for Bob and me. It made it all so much easier. We grew to love the two volunteers you sent. Their approach to Bob was different and exactly right. They were so unstinting with their time. Two remarkable human beings! Thank you for staying in touch.”
~Laura

Caring for those who are suffering,

“whether or not they are dying, wakes us up. It opens up our hearts and our minds. It opens us up to the experience of wholeness.”

-Frank Ostaseski


Mission Statement

Providing practical, emotional and spiritual support to individuals and their loved ones through the stages of dying, death and bereavement.

Hospice palliative care aims to make the last months of life comfortable, peaceful and dignified for patients and their caregivers by providing care, support, respite and advocacy. Our trained Hospice volunteers work as part of a caregiving team that could include community home nursing, doctors, hospital and facility staff, social workers and spiritual leaders.

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Nelson

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East Shore

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Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice Society shared a photo.Tuesday, April 16th, 2019 at 12:00pm
Today's a good day start these conversations with your loved ones. Use this as a guide to start.
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyTuesday, April 2nd, 2019 at 12:22pm
A beautiful post about how connected medical practitioners can be to their patients ... even after they die.
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice Society shared a link.Friday, March 22nd, 2019 at 8:05am
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyFriday, March 15th, 2019 at 8:42am
We have so much to learn about dying from ancient traditions:

"What have you learned about dying from [Thich Nhat Hanh]?

There is dying in the sense of letting this body go, letting go of feelings, emotions, these things we call our identity, and practicing to let those go.

The trouble is, we don’t let ourselves die day by day. Instead, we carry ideas about each other and ourselves. ...

Letting go is a practice not only when you reach 90. It’s one of the highest practices. This can move you toward equanimity, a state of freedom, a form of peace. Waking up each day as a rebirth, now that is a practice."
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyTuesday, February 12th, 2019 at 7:56am
If the prospect of Valentine’s Day is getting you down, try “reframing” the day with a little help from this article.
Nelson & District Hospice Society
Nelson & District Hospice SocietyWednesday, February 6th, 2019 at 6:39am
“Working in the frontlines of raw humanity” requires really good intentional self-care. This palliative care doc has learned this well.